The Privacy Shield – dead on arrival

Captain America Shield 04Five months after the ECJ ruled  that the Safe Harbor agreement is invalid the EU Commission has presented a new “Privacy Shield” that will replace the old agreement.

The Privacy Shield does contain some improvements regarding the rights of European citizens. It does not, however, fundamentally change the national security exception which brought down the agreement in the first place.

Recital 55 of the draft agreement reads as follows:

The Commission’s analysis shows that U.S. law contains clear limitations on the access and use of personal data transferred under the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield for national security purposes as well as oversight and redress mechanisms that provide sufficient safeguards for those data to be effectively protected against unlawful interference and the risk of abuse.

The Commission refers to Presidential Policy Directive 28 (“PPD-28”) regarding limitations on signal intelligence, issued by President Obama on January 17, 2014. The PPD-28 extends the same level of protection to non-US citizens as US citizens.

Sec.4 Safeguarding Personal Information Collected Through
Signals Intelligence

All persons should be treated with dignity and respect, regardless of their nationality or wherever they might reside, and all persons have legitimate privacy interests in the handling of their personal information.

That being said, any presidential policy directives may be overturned by future presidents, as this is a policy document, not an amendment to existing law (which permits the surveillance of non-US nationals, see FISAAA 2008 section 702). If you have the time, see the late Caspar Bowden’s excellent presentation on why agreements such as the Privacy Shield are doomed to fail:

Even if the PPD-28 would be allowed to stay in force AND the PPD-28 would be respected, it still endorses the mass collection of data:

Sec. 2 Limitations on the Use of Signals Intelligence Collected in Bulk
Locating new or emerging threats and other vital national security information is difficult, as such information is often hidden within the large and complex system of modern global communications. The United States must consequently collect signals intelligence in bulk.

Granted, the PPD-28 states that bulk collection must be used only for the detection and countering of (1) espionage, (2) terrorism, (3) weapons of mass destruction, (4) cybersecurity, (5) threats to US armed forces and their allies, and (6) transnational criminal threats. However, by its very definition, bulk collection means that all data is retained and accessible by the intelligence community, and there is no effective oversight on how that data is used. Let me cite Edward Snowden on what this boils down to in practice:

“In the course of their daily work they stumble across something that is completely unrelated to their work, for example an intimate nude photo of someone in a sexually compromising situation but they’re extremely attractive,” he said. “So what do they do? They turn around in their chair and they show a co-worker. And their co-worker says: ‘Oh, hey, that’s great. Send that to Bill down the way.’  (New York Times, July 20, 2014)

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